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16 of the Best Teaching Resources for Anti-Bullying Week 2019

November 11-15 is Anti-Bullying Week, and this year's theme is 'Change Starts With Us'. So get involved with this collection of excellent free resources for primary and secondary...

  • 16 of the Best Teaching Resources for Anti-Bullying Week 2019

1 | Anti-Bullying Alliance

Anti-Bullying Week happens in schools across England each November, which this year is Monday 11th to Friday 15th.

The theme this year is ‘Change Starts With Us’, with the idea being ‘Small change. Big difference’.

Whether it is verbal, physical, online or in-person, bullying has a significant impact on a child’s life well in to adulthood. By making small, simple changes, we can break this cycle and create a safe environment for everyone.

As it states on the website:

Change starts here.
Change starts now.
Change starts with us.

The goal is to inform schools and settings, children and young people, parents and carers to know that it takes a collective responsibility to stop bullying, and the Anti-Bullying Alliance wants to create empowering, positive messages addressing the fact that when it comes to bullying.

On the Anti-Bullying Alliance website you’ll find a primary school resource pack and a secondary school one.

There are also tools and advice on if you’re being bullied, support for teachers and for parents, and much more.

Find all this at anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/anti-bullying-week.


2 | Odd Socks Day

The Tuesday of Anti-Bullywing is Odd Socks Day, which is designed to be a fun opportunity for children to express themselves and celebrate their individuality and what makes us all unique.

All they have to do to take part is wear odd socks to school, it couldn’t be simpler!

Odd Socks Day usually takes place on the first day of Anti-Bullying Week each year, but this year it is happening on Tuesday 12th to avoid clashing with Armistice Day.

The aim is simply to help raise awareness around anti-bullying, and hopefully raise some money to help the charity.

Find out more and download resources here.


3 | Stop Speak Support

Next up, the Thursday of Anti-Bullying Week is Stop Speak Support, an initiative to help combat cyberbullying.

There is a toolkit for KS3 and KS4 available, which includes lesson plans, assembly plans, videos to show, activity ideas and a school poster.

Download it here.


4 | Create a culture of anti-bullying

You’re never too old to learn more about how your words and actions affect others; Rachel Summers has put together some inspiring activities to help teenagers improve their empathy skills including identifying the places where bullying can happen thoughtlessly, beginning to explore how by turning a blind eye to bullying, you become complicit in it, and discussing the ways in which we can stop bullying and create an anti-bullying culture.

Download this resource here.


5 | Tackling disability-related bullying

This resource has been developed for primary teachers to support equality work in their schools, so that all children can appreciate and celebrate the contribution that people with a disability can make in our society.

Every school will at some time have a child or children who have a disability and being able to develop their knowledge and understanding is at the heart of this document.

The Equality Duty requires schools to take a more proactive approach to promoting disability equality and eliminating discrimination and this can be done in many ways.

This resource for teachers gives practical advice and includes lesson plans that teachers can use to enhance children’s awareness and improve their levels of empathy for those with a disability.

Get this resource here.


6 | Anti-Bullying on film

Bullying is a sensitive and complex subject. This resource has been designed to enable teachers to use the accessible and inclusive medium of film to promote discussion not only about bullying, but also about related themes such as friendship, standing up for what is right, cyberbullying and the power of groups, both positive and negative.

This download comprises a 10-page guide for teachers, containing activity ideas and accompanying worksheets for primary and secondary learners. Said activities are intended to be used in conjunction with six selected film titles, which clubs can obtain free of charge from filmclub.org.

Download this resource here.


7 | Three films to combat bullying

While we’re on Into Film, here are three films it recommends (and many others are listed too) for exploring bullying on screen in your school, complete with questions and activities to promote discussion and encourage empathy.

Check it out here.


8 | Bullying UK

There’s a whole host of free resources on the Bullying UK website, where you can download Anti-Bullying Week assembly presentations, posters, flashcards and more.

There’s an advice activity, debate ideas, videos and a comic strip too.

And you can find all this here.


9 | Anti-bullying videos

OpenView Education has created a series of interactive anti-bullying videos to support schools, in which your KS1 and 2 students will meet the characters of Milly and Philip.

These videos can be used to spark creative discussions with your class and are a great way of introducing topics such as:​

  • Choose Respect – Bullying as a behaviour choice
  • Bullying vs Conflict – The difference between bullying and conflict
  • Celebrating Difference – Learning why it’s fun to have a friend who is different from us
  • Peer Pressure – Understanding Bullying as a group behaviour

Watch them all here.


10 | BBC bullying videos

The theme of 2017’s Anti-Bullying Week was ‘All Different, All Equal’, and the BBC created a collection of teaching resources for KS1-3 that shine a spotlight on bullying and explore difference.

There are animated versions of personal testimonies, stories about what drives someone to become a bully, one called ‘Am I a Bully?’ and more.

Check them all out here.


11 | Describing bullies with The BFG

Talk with your class about how we can deal with bullies, then use the activities and worksheets in this KS1 and KS2 Roald Dahl lesson plan to create your own description of a bully that uses similes and metaphors to great effect.

Download this resources here.


12 | We’re all Wonders

Consider themes of kindness, individual differences, dealing with personal challenges and the need to belong with this teaching and discussion guide for RJ Palacio’s incredible follow up to Wonder.

The guide includes discussion questions and classroom activities for younger and older primary children, pre-reading notes and the opportunity to become a certified kind classroom.

Download this resource here.


13 | Diary of a Wimpy Kid

The Diary of a Wimpy Kid books are the perfect companion for reluctant readers. Their comic book format makes them accessible, they’re bursting with laugh-out-loud moments and tackle important themes such as bullying and family life.

These activities will get students excited about the books while developing their literacy skills.

Download this resource here.


14 | Cloud Busting by Malorie Blackman

The central themes of bullying, friendship and difference are not so unusual, but the remarkable use of poetic forms, perfectly matched to the mood of each story section, has a profound effect.

Readers experience the narrator’s perspective in a sensory way that is hard to imagine being achieved in any other form. Christine Chen and Lindsay Pickton’s book topic helps students write emotive pieces using inspiration from the clouds. Haikus, limericks, alliteration and more are all covered.

Download this free book topic here.


15 | Bullied at work

Of course, it’s not just children who experience bullying in schools. Adults do too. And if teaching wasn’t hard enough as it is, it can be a nightmare when a colleague is making your life a misery.

This advice article from Mary Thornton and Pat Bricheno explains that while it can feel like there’s nowhere to turn, keeping your head down is often the worst thing to do.

Read it here.


16 | Bullied by my headteacher

In this anonymous article, our writer reveals how their manager created a toxic culture in my school, but they were determined not to be pushed out.

Read this one here.

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