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GCSE Results Day 2018 Reactions – What Students, Teachers and Education Experts are Saying

From the nervous wait to the big reveal, follow the responses to this year's secondary exam results...

  • GCSE Results Day 2018 Reactions – What Students, Teachers and Education Experts are Saying

The results are in! Envelopes have been opened, and students and teachers up and down the country have shared celebrations and commiserations.

Results days are always a mix of emotional extremes, where someone can be thrilled to receive a low passing grade while their classmate can be devastated about getting just the second-highest grade.

It’s nice to see that some students have the right attitude though:

She gets a 9 in ‘wisdom beyond her years’

The new GCSEs

This year is of course unique in that we have the 9-1 grading system, which made things difficult for teachers and students:

As well as families:

And it also makes it a little difficult to read too much into this year’s findings. But we’ll try regardless.

Writing for Education Datalab, Philip Nye states that: “Across all subjects, 21.5% of entries were awarded a grade 7/A or above, compared to 21.1% last year” and “At grade 4/C or above, 69.3% of entries achieved the standard this year, compared to 68.9% last year.”

While this isn’t a huge rise, Nye explains that both of these figures had been in decline since 2015, so this year’s increase bucks that trend.

So, what could be behind this improvement? Well, Nick Gibb was quoted in the Guardian saying:

“Thanks to our reforms and the hard work of teachers, education standards are rising in our schools and pupils have shown their abilities by achieving excellent results today, with so many pupils meeting and exceeding the standards we expect.”

Let us fix that for you, Nick.

“...Thanks to our reforms and the hard work of teachers, education standards are rising in our schools and pupils have shown their abilities by achieving excellent results today, with so many pupils meeting and exceeding the standards we expect.”

EBacc-lash

Nye also spotted that while entry numbers were up around 6 per cent for EBacc subjects, that this was rather dwarfed by those for science subject entries:

“In England and Wales, science, additional science and further additional science GCSEs have been replaced this year with a new double award science GCSE….This appears to have prompted some schools to review their science entry decisions – putting more pupils in for the three single sciences, and hence contributing to 22%, 18%, 17% and 10% increases in biology, chemistry, physics and computer science entries respectively among 16-year-olds across the UK this year.”

Boys improve

The Guardian are reporting that boys appear to have been the major beneficiary of the new GCSE examinations (although it’s impossible to say whether the new GCSEs are the reason they’ve improved), as “results showed across-the-board improvements in boys gaining top marks while girls saw their share of top grades dip”.

“Across the UK the proportion of students gaining an A or 7 and above, the new top grade used in England, rose above 20%, with boys in England closing the gap on girls with an almost one percentage point rise to 17.1% with girls unchanged at 23.4%.”

That gap, however, is still significant. Five per cent of girls’ entries received 9s, compared with just 3.6 per cent for boys.

Plus, there’s this:

For some excellent statistical breakdowns of this year’s results the Ofqual site has the following:

Twitter reacts

From the anxious buildup to the big day to the opening of the envelopes teens and teachers alike have been taking to social media to share their joy, vent their frustrations, and everything in between.

We’ve picked out some of the best:


Every cloud…


It’s never too late


They probably didn’t write their exam in TXT SPK, tbf


Glass half empty


Smart


We’re already on our third here. Catch up, mum


Dress for the results you want…


Regardless of whether students have been successful or not, whether they’ve overachieved, underachieved or hit their predicted grades dead-on, the issues of stress, pressure and mental health remain…

Haha! Michael Gove feeling? Good one.


Main image credits clockwise from top left: @MHSG, @TimSmithCEO, @WiganCouncil, @StMattAcad, @DorsetEchoCaz, @SWS_School

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