PrimaryEnglish

Teach Reading & Writing issue 19 is OUT NOW!

We live in interesting times, it seems. With worrying and distressing news bombarding children from all angles, we can struggle to think how best to support them.

But books, as ever, can provide us with invaluable tools for teaching and learning. 

In this issue of Teach Reading & Writing, BookTrust’s writer-in-residence, Rashmi Sirdeshpande, discusses the importance of good factual books in helping children to understand and navigate the world (page 24). While Carey Fluker Hunt has chosen 10 of the best books about war and conflict, and outlined activities to accompany each title that will help children think about these tricky subjects (page 12). 

There’s some comforting content on page 8 too, where A. F. Steadman, author of the Skandar books, advises KS2 children on how they can write a scene of companionable contentment – don’t miss the free online resource pack that supports this article. 

“Did you know that showing children subtitles while they’re watching television can double the chances of them becoming good at reading?”

On page 23 you can find out all about the Turn on the Subtitles project, which has had remarkable success. Did you know that showing children subtitles while they’re watching television can double the chances of them becoming good at reading? 

Speaking of success, the ever-popular Pie Corbett has written another model text for us (page 42). This time he’s retold a traditional tale in the style of a quirky and creepy detective story.

He’s provided teaching notes with real-world examples as well, to help you get pupils retelling stories in their own offbeat ways. 

We’ve got lots more writing advice in this issue too, including a refreshing article on page 30 from English advisor Kathryn Brereton. She left the classroom behind and headed to the woods to come up with some inspiring outdoorsy writing activities. 

There’s also some great advice from CLiPPA-winning poet Matt Goodfellow on how to teach verse novels (page 18), and some thoughts from Chris Youles (page 26) on how you can assess writing by… ditching the assessment criteria! 

Wishing you a happy and peaceful summer term. 

Lydia Grove – Editor 

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